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Old 12-04-2020, 12:22 PM   #1
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Default Initial & essential Tools

Hello Everyone!

Today is my 6-year-old’s B-day. I got him a Gen8, Scout I in Blue from ebay. His favorite show since before he could speak is how it’s made. When I showed him some modding videos and the manual he turned to me and said “I can’t wait to break it so I can fix it.” Looks like this hobby may be up this engineer to be’s alley.

So, I need to get some tools while keeping my wife from strangling me (she gave me a budget of $200 for everything. LOL!) I also need to get enough supplies to be able to do some basic modding and maintenance. Maybe more the latter than the former. After reading threads making some notes I came up with this list. If anyone could contribute any information to help me make this more complete or to edit some things. I would sincerely appreciate it.

I assume to start I need some Marine grease, purple permatex and basic drivers, whether for had tools or drills, so I can grease the axels and tighten the screws. Thankyou!


• Hex set and other hand tools with handles. (Any recommendation of a brand that is quality (Most important) but not too expensive? I have plenty of allen wrenches but I think the tools are more specified? I have CPE (CPE-HEXTOOLS), EDS, Team Associated and MIP as Brands that are good quality. Any others?)
 I assume it is best to get them with individual handles than a set with one handle.
• Hex set that fits a drill (Which brand is great in quality but not so costly)
• Drill (Is there a spefic type I should use? I have a Rigid ½” chuck hammer screw gun, but that may be too powerful? Will this work? RAQUL Rechargeable Cordless Screwdriver with USB Charger and LED Light,3.6V 1800mAh 3~10N.m Electric/Manual 2-in-1 Portable Electric Drill Hand Tool (https://www.amazon.com/RAQUL-Recharg...ag=googhydr-20))
• Needle nose pliers (I already have thexe. Many of them in fact)
• Small tubes of E6000 glue. They sell 'em in a pkg of 3 or 4. Used over drywall tape it will patch up cracks in your lexan body. (Which version should I buy? there is a yellow and grey one and there may be others.)
• Thread-locker medium strength (Purple Permatex?)
• Curved Hemostat for holding nuts in awkward places (have these as well)
• Good soldering iron (Already have for electronic soldering, unless a specified version is necessary)
• Most automotive grease, so get a tube or tub (Which grease should I use? I heard some use marine grease?)
• 30wt shock oil (No other weights needed? I have read that some use 40 for everything.)
• Spare bearings, screws, nuts (What size, which brand? Lost on this.)
• Xacto knives and blades, specifically #11 blades
• Hot glue Gun
• Dremel
• Pocket or laser Thermometer
• Little tub of silicon O ring grease for sealing waterproof receiver boxes
• A selection of cable & Velcro ties
• A fishing tackle box & Plano
• 5 in. Micro Flush Cutters (https://www.harborfreight.com/micro-...ter-90708.html)
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Old 12-04-2020, 01:19 PM   #2
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Default Initial & essential Tools

First off, I want to welcome you and your son to RCC! Getting him early I see, good choice. And Happy birthday to your son!

This is coming from someone just getting into crawling too, so take everything I say as a grain of salt.

I can only speak for tools I’ve used, but the Team Integy QuickPit set is pretty good, can go in any drill/impact/mini drill etc. and is only $28. It has all the hex sizes you need, plus some. Also, I recommend just getting a 7.0mm and 5.5mm nut driver. You can get them as an attachment that goes into any 1/4” chuck, or just separate drivers all together. I personally have the attachment, but that’s up to you.

Link to QuickPit set: https://www.amainhobbies.com/team-in...tc22778/p96692
Link to Nut Drivers: https://www.amainhobbies.com/dynamit...dyn2806/p38298

I use ParkTool Bicycle chain grease and VRP Honey Grease on my only rig(TRX4). Honey Grease is good for axle housings, diffs, spur gears, transmissions etc. bicycle chain grease is good, but not my go-to. I haven’t used marine grease, but I’ve heard it’s good.

That drill you have, is the chuck and clutch adjustable? If so, it will work. Just turn the clutch all the way down and the bit size on most tools is 1/4” not 1/2”. I personally think the small battery operated drills are junk, they are slow and your better off using a hand tool. I use a Porter Cable drill with adjustable clutch/chuck.

As adhesives, it never hurts to have and extra tube or two of epoxy and E6000 or Shoo Goo.

A hot glue gun sounds useful, but hot glue just isn’t strong enough. I had a hot glue gun, but I never use it. I have found epoxy or E6000 is way better.

I just have this $25 Weller stick soldering iron. Always go stick iron, never pistol grip. I had a pistol grip, and it was heavy and super uncomfortable and never heated up. I exchanged it for the Weller stick soldering iron, and it’s the best thing I’ve done in a while lol.

Weller soldering iron: https://www.amazon.com/Weller-SP40NK...NsaWNrPXRydWU=

I personally wouldn’t worry too much about spare bearings, since it’s a crawler you won’t be running through bearings too fast. You’ll collect spare nuts and bolts along the way. I have a whole drawer dedicated to it. I also wouldn’t worry about shock oil, I have had my TRX4 for almost a year and haven’t changed shock oil.

Xacto Knifes are a must! Dremel is nice, but I can’t say it’s a must since I’ve never used one before. Never hurts to have zip ties! I use Protek RC blue thread lock, and it works pretty good.

Another thing you may not have thought about is a stand. It’s nice for a lot of things. Just working on it in general is nice. If you are storing you rig for a while, put it on the stand so you don’t get flat spot in your tires.

RC stand I have: https://www.amazon.com/Hobbypark-Alu...109489&sr=8-12

Here’s some of my tips for workspace.
Lighting is key. No matter where you work, make sure you have plenty of lighting. I have a decent size clip on light that is nice to have for working on smaller stuff or working at night lol. Plenty of midnight working times.
Some sort of mat helps too. Typically, the surface your working on is slippery, causing screws to roll away. I made a big one for my desk since I wasn’t willing to pay a whole bunch for a big mat, and this only costed me $10 in kitchen drawer lining.
Tool storage is a must. I just have a 2x4 with a bunch of nails to hang tools on, but a cleaner way is a magnetic strip. Also have a couple plastic storage containers.
Comfortable chair, you’ll be sitting a lot.

Hope this helps some way!


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Last edited by ScaleLifeNewbie; 12-04-2020 at 01:22 PM.
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Old 12-04-2020, 01:22 PM   #3
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Default Re: Initial & essential Tools

I’d get a set of metric Allen head screwdrivers, easier to turn than Allen wrenches and not as fiddle as swapping out the bits on an interchangeable one.

I use a 5.5mm open end wrench a lot to hold the nut while turning lower shock mount screws, so definitely some metric wrenches in the small range.

For body work I just use an exacto blade without the handle (much more precise) to do the snap/score and the dremel for radius or clean up (metal grinding barrel, not a cutoff wheel). Much cleaner than body scissors imo

For grease I just use whatever I can reach, usually red n tacky or whatever happens to be open

Not sure if I saw it but shoe goo

I don’t use a drill or motorized screwdriver, prefer hand turning for precision and my tinkering time is cherished/relaxing so never in a hurry

Rest of the list looks great to me.
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Old 12-04-2020, 02:11 PM   #4
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Default Re: Initial & essential Tools

Welcome!

To start off with you will need some 1.mm through 2.5mm hex drivers. MIP / Wera will give really good life.

A decent knife. I just use Stanley carpet knives.

Get original Blue Locktite.

Decent marine grease.

Some philips screwdrivers.

Think about a micro ratchet that can drive 6mm hex bits. You get them in sets, Metabo and Bosch is good.

The most important spanner will be a 5.5mm.

Shock oil is all personal preference, but I only have 30 and 40 on hand... always.

Get some m3 allen caps, washers and nuts from any local engineering/fastener supplier. Get a mix lot of say 10each of the lengths your kit use. Your choice mild or stainless.
Add some m4 nylocks for the wheels.


You’ll figure the rest out as you go.

As for parts, a basic 20kg servo will be #1 on my list. Then some axle shafts for the front, a bag of Traxxas rod ends, a cheap motor, a 1060 esc and even a alu servo horn or two.


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Old 12-04-2020, 02:52 PM   #5
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Default Re: Initial & essential Tools

You probably won't need the thermometer. Your motor should not be so hot you can't touch it. Knowing the actual temperature isn't necessary.
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Old 12-04-2020, 03:04 PM   #6
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Default Re: Initial & essential Tools

Everyone has it pretty well covered. Getting metric hex bits for the drill was one of my favorite upgrades in tools. I also Picked up the 8 V deWalt electric screwdriver and I use it all the time. There was a whole thread on this not long ago and it’s pretty subjective. As mentioned above some guys prefer to use a standard drill and others like something a little less powerful that has more control. The Dewalt is expensive compared to other options but I like it for the control and lack of power compared to a drill. I also put together a fair number of Tamiya kits and there’s a lot of plastic to worry about. For general maintenance it’s probably overkill but I find something like that makes kit building much more enjoyable. If you get hooked on the hobby and build a kit, I also recommend lexan scissors or shears. I cut one body without them and realized how are useful they really are.
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Old 12-05-2020, 03:23 AM   #7
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Default Re: Initial & essential Tools

Think twice about getting a motorized driver for hex bits, etc. for use by a 6 year old. Have him learn to use his hands first to feel a screw's tightness. Stripping out screw holes can do a lot of damage and make expensive parts unusable.

Just my 2 cents.
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Old 12-05-2020, 05:29 AM   #8
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Default Re: Initial & essential Tools

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Originally Posted by calvinn View Post
Think twice about getting a motorized driver for hex bits, etc. for use by a 6 year old. Have him learn to use his hands first to feel a screw's tightness. Stripping out screw holes can do a lot of damage and make expensive parts unusable.

Just my 2 cents.

I hardly ever feel the need for a power driver. If I feel the need for one I just use my Bosch IXO. Its more than adequate.


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Old 12-05-2020, 07:46 AM   #9
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Default Re: Initial & essential Tools

• Hex set and other hand tools with handles. (Any recommendation of a brand that is quality (Most important) but not too expensive? I have plenty of allen wrenches but I think the tools are more specified? I have CPE (CPE-HEXTOOLS), EDS, Team Associated and MIP as Brands that are good quality. Any others?)

> Definitely get some hex drivers. Hex-keys are only practical for extremely tight or awkward situations which are rare. Not bad to have a basic set of keys on hand but they shouldn't get used much if at all. Hudy, MIP, Dynamite, Serpent, Protek, Associated... all good brands although some of these and other brands offer inexpensive/ low quality slternatives as well as their high-end lines. Go with the high-end tools to save on stripped hexes and headaches. If there's any tool for RC jobs that should be robust and reliable, it's hex-drivers. Don't cheap out here. Most good quality offerings will have aluminum handles... MIP being an exception.

> Please keep in mind some additional aspects of hex drivers maybe worth considering: The length of the shaft- Most times a longer shaft is what you'll want but there are times when a shorter driver may be better. I have long and short versions of most sizes for that versatility. Also consider the size and shape of the hex-driver handle. I prefer smaller cylindrical aluminum handles as opposed to larger plastic handles like the MIP's. I love my MIP drivers but the size and shape sometimes fatigues my hands more than the smaller aluminum ones. They're also a bit bulkier. Last thing to keep in mind is straight hex or ball hex. There are often times certain angles that will make using a ball-end driver much more efficient. Having at least several ball end drivers in your most used sizes will come in handy.


 I assume it is best to get them with individual handles than a set with one handle.

> I think so but YMMV. There are even times that I need two different driver sizes to use simultaneously. Switching tips can be a pain especially in some situations where you don't have two free hands. Many universal handles are also bulky and may not hold the bit adequately if you're pulling on it. I'd steer clear as they can be a hassle to use.

• Hex set that fits a drill (Which brand is great in quality but not so costly)

> I would stay away from the automatic/ battery-powered drivers altogether. If you do get one, don't spend much money for it and make sure it has a reliable clutch with a very light setting like the HyperTech from Walmart.

• Drill (Is there a spefic type I should use? I have a Rigid ½” chuck hammer screw gun, but that may be too powerful? Will this work? RAQUL Rechargeable Cordless Screwdriver with USB Charger and LED Light,3.6V 1800mAh 3~10N.m Electric/Manual 2-in-1 Portable Electric Drill Hand Tool (https://www.amazon.com/RAQUL-Recharg...ag=googhydr-20))

> Again... At least initially I'd stick with manual hex-drivers initially. As someone else stated, it's not hard to strip plastic ( or even metal) parts quickly. I'd become more familiar with manual hex-drivers and different plastics for a while before going that route.

• Needle nose pliers (I already have thexe. Many of them in fact)

> I rarely use my larger needle nose pliers for RC related duties but having a couple pairs of smaller needle nose pliers will be useful at times.


• Small tubes of E6000 glue. They sell 'em in a pkg of 3 or 4. Used over drywall tape it will patch up cracks in your lexan body. (Which version should I buy? there is a yellow and grey one and there may be others.)

> Regular E6000 should be sufficient. I also get the packs of small tubes (4 per pack). Always nice to have a fresh tube on hand when an already opened tube starts to set and become tacky.

• Thread-locker medium strength (Purple Permatex?)

> Med-strength Thread-locker is a must have. A box of toothpicks can really help to minimize mess and pinpoint application when using thread-lock. Also there is a thread-lock paste that others seem to like. I've not tried it before but maybe worth considering as the liquid thread-locker in tubes can be messy. Also with thread-locker always shake very well before use.

• Good soldering iron (Already have for electronic soldering, unless a specified version is necessary)

> Not sure what soldering supplies you have or regularly use but depending on how much you will use one, an adjustable heat setting can be great to have in a soldering rig. Also be sure to use flux paste as well as a thinner dia solder. A set of Helping-Hands ( brand) or other branded clamping work-stations are great to have... not a necessity especially if not soldering frequently but nice to have nonetheless.

• Most automotive grease, so get a tube or tub (Which grease should I use? I heard some use marine grease?)

> Some grease can be a bit heavy/ tacky which is fine in some applications like metal gears but not in all situations. Having a thinner lithium or silicone based grease may also be good to have on hand for certain applications. Brand doesn't matter but I'd try to stay away from most RC specific branded grease as they are VERY expensive considering the tiny amt that you get.

• 30wt shock oil (No other weights needed? I have read that some use 40 for everything.)

> Anywhere from 20-40 wt is a good range for most crawlers. If you ever get into fine-tuning your shocks, you can certainly go higher or lower ( Some ppl go up to 70wt) but I wouldn't worry too much about oil weight initially. Experimenting with spring rates, preload spacing, and piston damping will also go a long way to changing how a shock cycles and subsequently how the vehicle handles.

• Spare bearings, screws, nuts (What size, which brand? Lost on this.)

> I wouldn't worry about bearings at this time. Replace as necessary the specific size bearings that you feel need addressed. If you're proactive about cleaning and maintaining your rig then bearings shouldn't be an issue for quite a while. I also wouldn't be too concerned about extra screws/ screw sizes right now. At most, you may want to replace screws if and when they oxidize or strip out ( the hex head) with a stainless screw set for your particular vehicle. KnK, RC Screwz, and a host of other companies sell screw upgrade kits if you decide to go that route.

> I would keep some extra wheel-nuts on hand for sure. Nylon-locking nuts are obviously essential and often get lost as well as the nylon inserts wearing out over time. Not sure what size is specific to your rig ( 3mm- 4mm?) but definitely keep extras on hand. I never hit the rocks or trails without a few xtra wheel nuts and a nut-driver in my pocket. Sucks to have to carry your crawler a long distance just because you lost a wheel-nut and didn't have an extra one on hand. I actually keep spares on-board several of my rigs as well as small nut-drivers, xtra screws, servo horns, and hex-keys.

• Xacto knives and blades, specifically #11 blades

> X-acto blades are a necessity in most hobbies... RC for sure.


• Hot glue Gun

> Hot glue is great for certain applications but won't work worth a crap for other things. Depends on what surfaces/ substrates you're bonding together. Not bad to have on hand if you've already got one but I wouldn't invest a lot of money in one. I've got a super-cheap mini glue gun and refills that probably cost me all of about $5. I rarely use it for RC tasks.


• Dremel

> Always and forever. Dremel for life lol! The more bits the better although I use sanding drums and cut-off wheels the most for RC.

• Pocket or laser Thermometer

> I wouldn't waste the money. Nitro is another story but for crawlers, a quick touch will let you know if there's an issue with your motor running too hot.

• Little tub of silicon O ring grease for sealing waterproof receiver boxes

> Silicone, lithium, dielectric, etc... good to have on hand if running in wet conditions. I wouldn't invest much money in these though... Little goes a long way.

• A selection of cable & Velcro ties

> Various sizes of zip ties are a great asset... especially the smaller/ narrower ones. As far as velcro battery straps I wouldn't get a wide array of 'em. I would simply make sure that you're covered in terms of what you need for your particular vehicle/ battery/ battery tray. Amain and RPP have a good selection and most brands will specify widths/ lengths so that you can choose a couple sets close to what you think you need.

• A fishing tackle box & Plano

> Storage and organization are essential imo and you can never have too many tackle/ craft boxes with separate compartments. Acquire these as you go. I've got an insane amount of storage boxes large and small for all my automotive/ hobby/ RC parts.

• 5 in. Micro Flush Cutters (https://www.harborfreight.com/micro-...ter-90708.html)

> Any flush-cutters are good and most are relatively cheap. I've got probably 4-5 pairs. I keep at least one pair for softer wire/ plastic and my others I use more indiscriminately for various jobs.

>>> ScaleLifeNewbie made a couple points that I'd also agree with regarding the comfortable chair... not a necessity but really does help minimize body fatigue. Also his suggestion of a work surface is a good idea too... lots of RC-specific mats out there as well as cheaper alternatives... rubber mats, plywood, etc. And above all else... lighting! I use several different lights including a flexible LED desk lamp that really makes life so much better and gives my eyes some much needed assistance.

>>> Lastly... please make sure to have eye-protection and a dust respirator if you're going to be doing anything with grinding, cutting, soldering, etc. I don't wear mine as much as I should but there's times that I wished I had. After decades, my eyes and lungs would be in better shape had I been more proactive throughout the years.
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Old 12-05-2020, 10:05 AM   #10
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Default Re: Initial & essential Tools

Thanks for the suggestions. I will comeback with more questions after I digest the information. Right now I am searching for the screw size that attaches the servo to the servo link on the Gen8. It fell out in 15 minutes and the part is not included in the exploded views. After I put out that fire I will be back. Definitely see that I will have to get a screw pack. At least I would have some screws to test.
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Old 12-07-2020, 02:05 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ScaleLifeNewbie View Post
First off, I want to welcome you and your son to RCC! Getting him early I see, good choice. And Happy birthday to your son!
Thank You very much!
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Originally Posted by ScaleLifeNewbie View Post
Team Integy QuickPit set is pretty good, can go in any drill/impact/mini drill etc. and is only $28. It has all the hex sizes you need, plus some.
I have researched them & some say they are great while others say they have had some issues. I am really leaning toward MIP as the reviews are overwhelmingly positive. Question: Is there a difference between MIP and MIP thorpe? I read a few negative things about their handles, but that’s about it. I was leaning towards EDS or Dynamite red handles, but the Dynamites have had some negative reviews and I have not read much about EDS. Now I just have to figure out what are the necessary sizes. I know I need 2.5. I just want to get a set and know I am covered. Does anyone know of an all-inclusive MIP set?
Quote:
Originally Posted by ScaleLifeNewbie View Post
Also, I recommend just getting a 7.0mm and 5.5mm nut driver
I guess I am going to go with bits for power tools and handles. I am sure they will be appropriate for different tasks. So as far as nut drivers, the 7.0 and 5.5mm are the only ones I would need correct? I am going to go with Dynamite marine grease. Found a tube that I can get a little pump for.
Quote:
Originally Posted by ScaleLifeNewbie View Post
That drill you have, is the chuck and clutch adjustable?.
It does have a clutch and can accept anything up to ½”. I guess I will use it for now and maybe get a less powerful version in the future. I do plan on getting some E6000, though I do have a glue gun. I do hear you on the strength of hot clue. I will use E6000, but how hard weill it be to remove something like a light kit with E6000. Would hot glue be better because you can remove it more easily? At least for something like lights? I have a pretty nice Weller that should do the trick. I also have the Xacto knives and a Dremel. Thanks for the tip on shock oil. I will wait on that.
Quote:
Originally Posted by ScaleLifeNewbie View Post
Another thing you may not have thought about is a stand. It’s nice for a lot of things. Just working on it in general is nice. If you are storing you rig for a while, put it on the stand so you don’t get flat spot in your tires. RC stand I have: https://www.amazon.com/Hobbypark-Alu...109489&sr=8-12
I had not thought that a stand was essential but now I can see why. I hope the RC will not be stored for a while, but I can see how that would happen. Any other suggestions for stands? I know nothing. I say some where much cheaper but raided the car .5” less. Not sure what to look for in these. I assume I could also use some wood to lift the car for now to avoid the flat spots. As far as your workplace tips: I will also look into getting a mat for working on the car. I wasn’t willing to pay a whole bunch for a big mat, and this only costed me $10 in kitchen drawer lining. I know how important light is and have plenty of tool storage, fishing tackle boxes and extra magnetic strips. I really appreciate you input. Thanks!
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Originally Posted by Phildirt View Post
I’d get a set of metric Allen head screwdrivers, easier to turn than Allen wrenches and not as fiddle as swapping out the bits on an interchangeable one…Rest of the list looks great to me.
Thank you. What brand do you recommend for the tools. I am leaning towards MIP but am still considering others.
Quote:
Originally Posted by HugoBiermann View Post
Welcome! To start off with you will need some 1.mm through 2.5mm hex drivers. MIP / Wera will give really good life.
Thanks! I have never seen a 1mm. Are they used much? Mostly 1.5,2,2.5 and three are recommended but, like I said, I want to buy a set and have it in case there is a need. I hate it when I have to stop and go to the hardware store, IF they even supply the part I am looking for. Never heard of Wera…
Quote:
Originally Posted by HugoBiermann View Post
Get original Blue Locktite.
I already got Purple Permatex. Why do you prefer the blue over the purple?
Quote:
Originally Posted by HugoBiermann View Post
Think about a micro ratchet that can drive 6mm hex bits. You get them in sets, Metabo and Bosch is good.
Never thought of this. Can you provide links. I don’t think I am looking in the right place. Is this what you are referring to? https://www.amazon.com/Bosch-2607017...7364697&sr=8-2 Any other brands? Anybody else want to weigh in on this as far as brands and sets to purchase? Thanks for the suggestion on shock oil. I will wait on that unless you think it is more important than ScaleLifeNewbie does.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Phildirt View Post
Get some m3 allen caps, washers and nuts from any local engineering/fastener supplier. Get a mix lot of say 10each of the lengths your kit use. Your choice mild or stainless. Add some m4 nylocks for the wheels.
Any suggestion on which type. I have read that stainless steel is soft. I don’t know if the black oxidaized screws are better, I notice the proprietary screws are black. I assume it does not matter the brand and that axial screws can be used on redcat, etc…
Quote:
Originally Posted by Phildirt View Post
As for parts, a basic 20kg servo will be #1 on my list. Then some axle shafts for the front, a bag of Traxxas rod ends, a cheap motor, a 1060 esc and even a alu servo horn or two.
I am not there but thanks for the suggestions. If anything, I am planning on getting a Flysky FS-GT5 so I can change the Expo and Dual Rates to make it easier for him to drive. Next the ESC for the same reason. I may buy both the same time. The motor is fine for now. He does not need more. I do want to do an easy mod or two to whet his appetite. Any easy one if anyone has suggestions. I was thinking of adding a guard for the servo….
Quote:
Originally Posted by Boomer75 View Post
I also Picked up the 8 V deWalt electric screwdriver and I use it all the time. There was a whole thread on this not long ago and it’s pretty subjective. As mentioned above some guys prefer to use a standard drill and others like something a little less powerful that has more control. The Dewalt is expensive compared to other options but I like it for the control and lack of power compared to a drill. .
I will look into it. I have dewalt drills but not the 8volt. Any other suggestions on low power drivers from anyone?
Quote:
Originally Posted by Boomer75 View Post
If you get hooked on the hobby and build a kit, I also recommend lexan scissors or shears. I cut one body without them and realized how are useful they really are.
Quote:
Originally Posted by calvinn View Post
Think twice about getting a motorized driver for hex bits, etc. for use by a 6 year old. Have him learn to use his hands first to feel a screw's tightness. Stripping out screw holes can do a lot of damage and make expensive parts unusable.
Yeah, the drill would be for me to use, but tanks for underlining that. You never know…
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Old 12-07-2020, 02:06 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HugoBiermann View Post
I hardly ever feel the need for a power driver. If I feel the need for one I just use my Bosch IXO. Its more than adequate.
Thanks Hugo!
Quote:
Originally Posted by high plains drifter View Post
• Hex set and other hand tools with handles. (Any recommendation of a brand that is quality (Most important) but not too expensive? I have plenty of allen wrenches but I think the tools are more specified? I have CPE (CPE-HEXTOOLS), EDS, Team Associated and MIP as Brands that are good quality. Any others?) > Definitely get some hex drivers. Hex-keys are only practical for extremely tight or awkward situations which are rare. Not bad to have a basic set of keys on hand but they shouldn't get used much if at all. Hudy, MIP, Dynamite, Serpent, Protek, Associated... all good brands although some of these and other brands offer inexpensive/ low quality slternatives as well as their high-end lines. Go with the high-end tools to save on stripped hexes and headaches. If there's any tool for RC jobs that should be robust and reliable, it's hex-drivers. Don't cheap out here. Most good quality offerings will have aluminum handles... MIP being an exception. .
Thank you for the detailed explanation high plains drifter! If I were to go with an aluminum driver set, which would you go with. Protek seems to be the most reputable of the bunch, but I would appreciate more input.
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Originally Posted by high plains drifter View Post
• > Please keep in mind some additional aspects of hex drivers maybe worth considering: The length of the shaft- Most times a longer shaft is what you'll want but there are times when a shorter driver may be better. I have long and short versions of most sizes for that versatility. Also consider the size and shape of the hex-driver handle. I prefer smaller cylindrical aluminum handles as opposed to larger plastic handles like the MIP's. I love my MIP drivers but the size and shape sometimes fatigues my hands more than the smaller aluminum ones. They're also a bit bulkier. Last thing to keep in mind is straight hex or ball hex. There are often times certain angles that will make using a ball-end driver much more efficient. Having at least several ball end drivers in your most used sizes will come in handy.
Yes, I was not aware of this before. Can I use ball-end for everything? I rather just go with one set. I have only noticed MIP having ball ends, are there others?
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Originally Posted by high plains drifter View Post
• Hex set that fits a drill (Which brand is great in quality but not so costly) > I would stay away from the automatic/ battery-powered drivers altogether. If you do get one, don't spend much money for it and make sure it has a reliable clutch with a very light setting like the HyperTech from Walmart.
Thanks for the tip! Is this what you were referring to: https://www.walmart.com/ip/Hyper-Tou...-Bits/45466955 Anybody have any quams with this model?
Quote:
Originally Posted by high plains drifter View Post
• Good soldering iron (Already have for electronic soldering, unless a specified version is necessary) > Not sure what soldering supplies you have or regularly use but depending on how much you will use one, an adjustable heat setting can be great to have in a soldering rig. Also be sure to use flux paste as well as a thinner dia solder. A set of Helping-Hands ( brand) or other branded clamping work-stations are great to have... not a necessity especially if not soldering frequently but nice to have nonetheless.
I have a variable temp soldering iron.
Quote:
Originally Posted by high plains drifter View Post
• Most automotive grease, so get a tube or tub (Which grease should I use? I heard some use marine grease?) > Some grease can be a bit heavy/ tacky which is fine in some applications like metal gears but not in all situations. Having a thinner lithium or silicone based grease may also be good to have on hand for certain applications. Brand doesn't matter but I'd try to stay away from most RC specific branded grease as they are VERY expensive considering the tiny amt that you get.
Thanks! I got the marine grease. I what applications do you think the lithium or silicone grease is useful?
Quote:
Originally Posted by high plains drifter View Post
• Spare bearings, screws, nuts (What size, which brand? Lost on this.) > KnK, RC Screwz, and a host of other companies sell screw upgrade kits if you decide to go that route. > I would keep some extra wheel-nuts on hand for sure. Nylon-locking nuts are obviously essential and often get lost as well as the nylon inserts wearing out over time. Not sure what size is specific to your rig ( 3mm- 4mm?) but definitely keep extras on hand. I never hit the rocks or trails without a few xtra wheel nuts and a nut-driver in my pocket. Sucks to have to carry your crawler a long distance just because you lost a wheel-nut and didn't have an extra one on hand. I actually keep spares on-board several of my rigs as well as small nut-drivers, xtra screws, servo horns, and hex-keys.
Any suggestion on which is a good brand. I want to get good drivers and I hear some of these are soft. I will definitely get some Nylocks.
Quote:
Originally Posted by high plains drifter View Post
>>> Lastly... please make sure to have eye-protection and a dust respirator if you're going to be doing anything with grinding, cutting, soldering, etc. I don't wear mine as much as I should but there's times that I wished I had. After decades, my eyes and lungs would be in better shape had I been more proactive throughout the years.
Thanks! Yes, I wear eye protection and I do wear a dusk mask whenever I grind or cut anything that produces small particles. An important tip along with the lighting, organization and comfort tips you also provided. Thank you all for your input! I really appreciate it. If you have anything else to impart, I am all ears…er…eyes!LOL!
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Old 12-07-2020, 02:53 PM   #13
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Default Initial & essential Tools

I’ve never used MIP, but I’ve heard a lot of good and I’ll be getting those for sure sometime. I don’t know the difference between the two either, sorry. I’ve only used 5.5mm and 7.0mm on my rig, but I did use a 4.0mm to attach a scale accessory, so I would get a nut driver set that has those sizes in it. Ball end bits can be used normally, but I’ve never needed a ball end bit so personally I would just go with normal end bits.

I started with a cut down 4x4 which definitely works, but I like the ability to spin it, definitely not a necessity to have it spin though.

As for hot glue and lights, what do you mean for lights? Are you saying like attaching the wires to the body? If so, I just use some electrical tape.

Just turn the clutch all the way down and hand tighten the last bit of a screw and you’ll be fine. I use a big 24v drill and I like it better than my lesser-powered drill.

I know you said you wanted more recommendations on more stands, so here’s another that seems really nice: https://www.amainhobbies.com/ecopowe...-3001/p1154834

I have bent the one I have now, but it still works. I don’t know if I’d buy it again.


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Last edited by ScaleLifeNewbie; 12-07-2020 at 03:01 PM.
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Old 12-07-2020, 03:05 PM   #14
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Default Re: Initial & essential Tools

Hot glue is handy for attaching wires to the body. Nice clean look if you take your time/go easy on the glue. Pretty durable too. I have a roll bar attached to a truck bed that has survived a bazillion roll overs and it is attached with only hot glue lol. Its a beater truck so don't really care about it but it is stronger than you'd think.
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Old 12-07-2020, 05:05 PM   #15
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Default Re: Initial & essential Tools

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Originally Posted by Mario385 View Post
Thanks Hugo! Thank you for the detailed explanation high plains drifter! If I were to go with an aluminum driver set, which would you go with. Protek seems to be the most reputable of the bunch, but I would appreciate more input. Yes, I was not aware of this before. Can I use ball-end for everything? I rather just go with one set. I have only noticed MIP having ball ends, are there others? Thanks for the tip! Is this what you were referring to: https://www.walmart.com/ip/Hyper-Tou...-Bits/45466955 Anybody have any quams with this model? I have a variable temp soldering iron. Thanks! I got the marine grease. I what applications do you think the lithium or silicone grease is useful? Any suggestion on which is a good brand. I want to get good drivers and I hear some of these are soft. I will definitely get some Nylocks. Thanks! Yes, I wear eye protection and I do wear a dusk mask whenever I grind or cut anything that produces small particles. An important tip along with the lighting, organization and comfort tips you also provided. Thank you all for your input! I really appreciate it. If you have anything else to impart, I am all ears…er…eyes!LOL!
Protek may have the most reviews on a certain site or on social media but they're not any better than other top brands already mentioned. Make sure that you like the way that the handles look in regards to what you think will suit you best/ be most comfortable. Hudy is a personal favorite of mine due to the handles, the replaceable shafts, the long length of the shafts as well as the hex, the spring-steel material, and of course their unsurpassed quality.

So given a budget I'd pick longer shaft length hex-drivers over shorter length shafts although shorter length drivers hold their value when you need to get into a tighter spot and a long shaft makes access difficult. But again... If I could only have one... I would choose longer shafts as they will be used more often than shorter ones.

Regarding ball-end drivers, I really don't recommend using a ball driver unless it's necessary. The angles that you need them for will be asking a lot of that little ball end and what will happen is that with low quality ball-end drivers they will wear out ( round out) quickly and with high-end ball-drivers they will sometimes wear out the hex shape on the screw-head... and they'll eventually round out as well.

Again... if on a budget I would pick a quality set of straight hex drivers with longer shaft lengths... Done. Then I would get at the very least, a 2mm ball-end long shaft hex driver ( same brand as the set or a different brand as long as it's good quality). Then if able, I'd get a 2mm and 1mm shorter length straight hex-driver. That would cover you in most situations. Keep in mind also, that there are some inexpensive ball-driver sets ( US and metric) like Great Plains that can come in quite handy if not used too often on tightly torqued screws. back to the main point though... I definitely try not to use my ball-end drivers except when necessary. That minimizes the wear. One last thing worth mentioning on this topic... There are many situations where a ball-end driver will be a pain to use... such as times where you need to insert a screw into a hard-to-reach location. A straight-hex will keep that screw pointing where you want it to go as opposed to a ball-end driver that will allow the screw to flop around or fall off the ball-hex completely. Not sure if that makes sense but simply put, ball-hex drivers and straight-hex drivers are not always interchangeable. That's why it really is best to have at least one of each in the most used size(s) like 2mm.

And yes... most higher-end drivers offer straight as well as ball-end type drivers... not just MIP. Listings will specify if a driver is of the ball-end type although straight-hex drivers usually won't make mention of straight, regular, square, etc.

Yep... That's the cordless driver that I use and have begun recommending to others as I have really put it through it's paces over the last few months. Sorry but I don't remember what hex bits came with it but if you decide to get any cordless driver that you it has or you additionally purchase the bits that you need ( 2mm being the most used). Lowes and HD have hex bit sets fwiw.

Lithium grease is good to have on hand ( in a small amt) for things like plastic gear sets as well as some other lubricating tasks where marine grease may be overkill or simply too heavy/ tacky. Same with silicone. I wouldn't rush out to get either of these but it's nice to have on hand as a another lubrication alternative in certain situations for plastic on plastic parts, low temp applications, etc. Brand shouldn't matter... I just wouldn't spend much on this.
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Old 12-07-2020, 08:15 PM   #16
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Default Re: Initial & essential Tools

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Originally Posted by ScaleLifeNewbie View Post
I know you said you wanted more recommendations on more stands, so here’s another that seems really nice: https://www.amainhobbies.com/ecopowe...-3001/p1154834.
Thanks for your suggestions. That stand does look nice. I may purchase it
Quote:
Originally Posted by high plains drifter View Post
Protek may have the most reviews on a certain site or on social media but they're not any better than other top brands already mentioned. Make sure that you like the way that the handles look in regards to what you think will suit you best/ be most comfortable. Hudy is a personal favorite of mine due to the handles, the replaceable shafts, the long length of the shafts as well as the hex, the spring-steel material, and of course their unsurpassed quality.

So given a budget I'd pick longer shaft length hex-drivers over shorter length shafts although shorter length drivers hold their value when you need to get into a tighter spot and a long shaft makes access difficult. But again... If I could only have one... I would choose longer shafts as they will be used more often than shorter ones.

Regarding ball-end drivers, I really don't recommend using a ball driver unless it's necessary. The angles that you need them for will be asking a lot of that little ball end and what will happen is that with low quality ball-end drivers they will wear out ( round out) quickly and with high-end ball-drivers they will sometimes wear out the hex shape on the screw-head... and they'll eventually round out as well.

Again... if on a budget I would pick a quality set of straight hex drivers with longer shaft lengths... Done. Then I would get at the very least, a 2mm ball-end long shaft hex driver ( same brand as the set or a different brand as long as it's good quality). Then if able, I'd get a 2mm and 1mm shorter length straight hex-driver. That would cover you in most situations. Keep in mind also, that there are some inexpensive ball-driver sets ( US and metric) like Great Plains that can come in quite handy if not used too often on tightly torqued screws. back to the main point though... I definitely try not to use my ball-end drivers except when necessary. ..

And yes... most higher-end drivers offer straight as well as ball-end type drivers... not just MIP. Listings will specify if a driver is of the ball-end type although straight-hex drivers usually won't make mention of straight, regular, square, etc.

Yep... That's the cordless driver that I use and have begun recommending to others as I have really put it through it's paces over the last few months....

Thanks for breaking things down for me. I am leaning toward MIP as the Hudy are pricey.
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Old 12-08-2020, 09:25 AM   #17
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Default Re: Initial & essential Tools

Yea , I meant 1.5mm hex. I find that the blue locktite i get is ‘sticky’ enough and doesn’t ‘lock’ the thread as much as others.

The 1/4” hex socket sets look like this:




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Old 12-08-2020, 06:27 PM   #18
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Thanks once again Hugo! Much appreciated!
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Old 01-02-2021, 04:38 PM   #19
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Default Re: Initial & essential Tools

Didn’t see it listed but for my older eyes a good lighted magnifying glass mounted to my bench, I also use it very much at my ammunition reloading bench.
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Old 01-02-2021, 06:34 PM   #20
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Default Re: Initial & essential Tools

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Originally Posted by Mario385 View Post
Thanks for your suggestions. That stand does look nice. I may purchase it



Thanks for breaking things down for me. I am leaning toward MIP as the Hudy are pricey.

Don’t know if this was mentioned or not but don’t write off Vanquish drivers.

I have Vanquish and MIP hex drivers and ProTek SL nut drivers.

For me the Vanquish handles are superior to MIP and ProTek.

That bearing end cap is incredible and just the weight/balance/fit of the handle is great.

The rotating end cap of the ProTek is rough and gritty at first but after oiling and use it smooths out.

Not anywhere close to the Vanquish end cap though.

My Vanquish hex tips have held up great. 2mm is just as sharp as new and the 1.5 has gone through some abuse dealing with ring gears and spools. No issues.

I look at tools as a buy once, cry once deal. Especially the hex drivers.

If Vanquish and MIP merged and came out with Vanquish handles and MIP tips, imo, that’d be the ultimate hand tool.
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