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Old 05-04-2005, 08:08 PM   #1
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Question Hopefully last request in my purchase

Can someone list all the tools/attachments/etc for a mill and a lathe, along qith a description of thier job? Is there a description like this already around somewhere?

Also, what are the main parts of a mill, and what are they for? I see mention of different maneuvers done with thier machine, but they are referring to things I don't understand.

Something Milling for Idiots...

Lastly, and this is just to spur my imagination, could some do a step-by-step for the process of making a part on a mill? In laymens terms?

I am embarassingly uneducated on these machines.
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Old 05-04-2005, 08:59 PM   #2
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BlueMonster
Can someone list all the tools/attachments/etc for a mill and a lathe, along qith a description of thier job? Is there a description like this already around somewhere?

Also, what are the main parts of a mill, and what are they for? I see mention of different maneuvers done with thier machine, but they are referring to things I don't understand.

Something Milling for Idiots...

Lastly, and this is just to spur my imagination, could some do a step-by-step for the process of making a part on a mill? In laymens terms?

I am embarassingly uneducated on these machines.
Holy cow!

I was looking for something to write about in the upcoming Chop Shop!

This is perfect since I'm teaching myself as I go. If I can do it....

Although it'll be 2-3 months before the article hits the shelves, PM me with your mailing address and I'll ship you something from around the shop. ;)

Last edited by JasonInAugusta; 05-06-2005 at 09:47 AM.
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Old 05-04-2005, 09:24 PM   #3
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PM en route!
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Old 05-04-2005, 09:33 PM   #4
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Here are some of the huge list of terms I don't understand...

dovetails
box ways
rail ways
leadscrews
brass gibs
ground steel ways
X axis
Y axis
Z axis
Mechanical Resolution
Electrical Resolution
cross slide table
vice (I know what a vice is, I don't see one as I know it in any pics)
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Old 05-06-2005, 08:08 AM   #5
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BlueMonster,

Here’s a great on-line tutorial by some Japanese guy.

You might find it useful:

http://www.nmri.go.jp/eng/khirata/me...k/index_e.html

*********

You might want to see about either purchasing this book or checking it out of the local library.
Great pictures and a lot of information.
I don’t even own a Sherline, but I found this a very interesting book.

Tabletop Machining, by Joe Martin

http://www.sherline.com/bookplug.htm

**********

The book that I have worn out using as a reference is:
Machine Tool Practices by Richard R. Kibble
I have the 3rd edition, and the seventh edition is in print now.
This will answer every one of your questions.
This book is used as a textbook in machining courses.

http://btobsearch.barnesandnoble.com...sbn=0130334472

**********

And last, but definitely not least is:

Machinery’s Handbook 27th edition

http://btobsearch.barnesandnoble.com...07&TXT=Y&itm=2

This is the “Bible” for a Machinist.
It is a reference book, filled with tables.
It has tables to show you how to drill circular holes using X, Y coordinates only
and many, many more little "tricks" of the trade.
I have never met a machinist who made chips for a living, not have this book in their tool chest.
But with the advent of CNC, maybe they don’t use it anymore.
I have a “new” 23rd edition, and consult it constantly.

********

Happy reading.
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Old 05-06-2005, 09:47 AM   #6
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Also...Doug Briney's "Home Machinist's Handbook"

Laymens terms. ;)

http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg...28614?v=glance
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Old 05-06-2005, 10:37 AM   #7
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More stuff you can check out.

Advice:
Get some books before you purchase anything.
CNC is a very big jump for your 1st machine.You may spend more time drawing/programming than actually making chips. :?
And never stop asking for assistance and/or advice.
Nobody knows everything. :-P

********

For a really inexpensive ($7.95), yet a very informative book on lathes,
May I suggest: How to run a Lathe by “The South Bend Lathe Works”

It was originally printed in 1942, but it is great for the home machinist.

http://www.littlemachineshop.com/pro...ProductID=1596


************

Another old, but still very good reference is:

Machine Shop Practice by K.H. Moltrecht Volumes 1 & 2.
These books first came out in 1979 and were intended for machinist apprentices.
There is a lot of information in these two books.

About $35.00 for both books.

http://www.use-enco.com/CGI/INSRIT?P...&PARTPG=INLMK3

http://www.use-enco.com/CGI/INSRIT?P...&PARTPG=INLMK3

Google the name for other places that carry it. (i.e. Amazon)

Last edited by BultacoJim; 05-06-2005 at 10:43 AM.
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Old 05-06-2005, 11:41 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BlueMonster
Also, what are the main parts of a mill, and what are they for? I see mention of different maneuvers done with thier machine, but they are referring to things I don't understand.

Something Milling for Idiots...
Definitions:
http://www.engineersedge.com/manufacturing.htm
http://www.columbia.edu/cu/mechanica...ses/lab/3.html

Need a diploma from Tooling U University?

http://www.toolingu.com/tu/custom_tr...Machining.html

I have never rented a VHS/DVD for machining, but so what. Information, is information.
Rudy Kouhoupt is THE man. He just recently passed away, :-( but he knew his stuff.


http://technicalvideorental.com/rental_12.html

http://technicalvideorental.com/rental_13.html

*******
More info:

Print out the Mini Lathe User’s Guide before they take it away.

http://www.littlemachineshop.com/Inf...UsersGuide.pdf

Here’s the main site where you can also check out the tooling for both mini lathes and mills.

http://www.littlemachineshop.com/Inf...ng_started.php


If all this information doesn’t keep you busy, then you have too much time on your hands.
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Old 05-06-2005, 07:23 PM   #9
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WOW!

That's a TON of info, I have a lot of reading to do! Thanks!

On getting a CNC setup first vs not, is it cost prohibitive to get it right off the bat, or later? Or is more of a learning curve thing?

I do want to be able to play with it right away, not spend several weeks trying to learn to program it before I get to actually make something...
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Old 05-06-2005, 08:09 PM   #10
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I think that a CNC would be cool if you want to make multiples of an item but for most of what I do, which is make one of a kind parts for whatever I'm building, a manual setup should be cool. Cost is also a major factor.

I saw a couple of Grizzly mills the other day, went to pick up some aluminum and a lil' vertical mount for my rotary table. The guy had two Grizzlies and showed me how much play was in them. You could turn the hand wheel about 1/3 turn before anything moved.
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Old 05-06-2005, 08:25 PM   #11
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That is an excellent point. If I want to make any one-off parts and I have a CNC, I am stuck doing all the coding for that one part? If that's true, is there is CNC version that will allow for manual control as well? Or is that just not the way it works?
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Old 05-06-2005, 09:15 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JasonInAugusta
I think that a CNC would be cool if you want to make multiples of an item but for most of what I do, which is make one of a kind parts for whatever I'm building, a manual setup should be cool. Cost is also a major factor.
Good advice JIA, I started out on manual mills and lathes. When I made the transition to CNC's it made it easier. Buying a manual machine and teaching yourself may take a little time, but at least you can start making chips fairly quick.

CNC's will definitly take longer to learn. You will have to punch code for each part you make, if you don't use a programming software. But, you can save the programs and remake parts with very little effort.
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Old 05-06-2005, 09:31 PM   #13
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Well, I trust you guys, so a manual mill it will be. On the other hand, it'll be a TON less cash!
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Old 05-06-2005, 09:50 PM   #14
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Okay, what should I get here? I would assume the 2019UPG is the highest level I can go before I start getting into the CNC realm?

http://www.taigtools.com/mmill.html

Last edited by BlueMonster; 05-06-2005 at 10:02 PM.
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